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Bright Green Light Zooming Through Home


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#1 aisLinnZ

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 11:33 AM

A few yrs back, I had started dinner, and went into the living room sitting on the floor helping my kids with homework(here,at that time even kindergarten gave kids homework..), while dinner was finishing cooking.

It was dusk, but not dark outside completely yet. So we had a few lights on. But then suddenly the electricity went out , my son and I looked up and a basketball sized bright green light zoomed from the kitchen straight to us , stopped and was gone. The electricity came back on again. My daughter(she was maybe 5 then) had looked down for a paper so hadn't seen the light.

My son though-he was petrified. He asked over and over "mom, what was that? I mean mom, what was THAT?" I couldn't calm him (I kinda said it must have some electrical thing), and was not upset like he was, but I knew it wasn't normal-and BOTH of us saw it. I had to call my mom long distance, she helped calm him.

I tried looking up back then, what a random super bright green large light that moved fast, could be- but never really identified what 'it' was. Any thoughts , or similar type experience? I still ponder over that.
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#2 Tantric KittenGStudy

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 11:47 AM

My immediate thought is ball lightning.

https://en.m.wikiped.../Ball_lightning
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#3 siguie

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 12:01 PM

I'm thinking slimmer :yes:
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#4 aisLinnZ

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 04:09 PM

I will look up ball lightening (though it was a cloudless warm evening) & 'slimmer'~ !
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#5 MacCionoadha BeanSidhe

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 08:05 PM

It could be Clear-air lightning.

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Clear-air lightning describes lightning that occurs with no apparent cloud close enough to have produced it. In the U.S. and Canadian Rockies, a thunderstorm can be in an adjacent valley and not observable from the valley where the lightning bolt strikes, either visually or audibly. European and Asian mountainous areas experience similar events. Also in areas such as sounds, large lakes or open plains, when the storm cell is on the near horizon (within 26 kilometres (16 mi)) there may be some distant activity, a strike can occur and as the storm is so far away, the strike is referred to as a bolt from the blue.[56] In fact, it actually originates from the anvil cloud atop a thunderstorm which may be as far as thirty miles away.[57] It carries around ten times the current of an ordinary bolt of lightning and has a positive charge while most other lightning has a negative one. This commonly is known as positive lightning

or Plasma lights can be caused by earthquakes.

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Research into earthquake lights is ongoing; as such, several mechanisms have been proposed.
The most recent model suggests that the generation of earthquake lights involves the ionization of oxygen to oxygen anions by breaking of peroxy bonds in some types of rocks by the high stress before and during an earthquake. After the ionisation, the ions travel up through the cracks in the rocks. Once they reach the atmosphere these ions can ionise pockets of air, forming plasma that emits light.[13] Lab experiments have validated that some rocks do ionise the oxygen in them when subjected to high stress levels. Research suggests that the angle of the fault is related to the likelihood of earthquake light generation, with subvertical (nearly vertical) faults in rifting environments having the most incidences of earthquake lights.[14]
A different explanation involves intense electric fields created piezoelectrically by tectonic movements of rocks containing quartz.[15]
Another possible explanation is local disruption of the Earth's magnetic field and/or ionosphere in the region of tectonic stress, resulting in the observed glow effects either from ionospheric radiative recombination at lower altitudes and greater atmospheric pressure or as aurora. However, the effect is clearly not pronounced or notably observed at all earthquake events and is yet to be directly experimentally verified.[16]
During the American Physical Society's 2014 March meeting, research was provided that gave a possible explanation for the reason why bright lights sometimes appear during an earthquake. The research stated that when two layers of the same material rub against each other, voltage is generated. The researcher, Professor Troy Shinbrot of Rutgers University, conducted lab experiments with different types of grains to mimic the crust of the earth and emulated the occurrence of earthquakes. "When the grains split open, they measured a positive voltage spike, and when the split closed, a negative spike." The crack allows the voltage to discharge into the air which then electrifies the air and creates a bright electrical light when it does so. According to the research provided, they have produced these voltage spikes every single time with every material tested. While the reason for such an occurrence was not provided, Professor Troy Shinbrot referenced the light to a phenomenon called triboluminescence. Researchers hope that by getting to the bottom of this phenomenon, it will provide more information that will allow seismologists to better predict earthquakes.


Then there's gases from decaying matter escaping a boggy area that ignite. They are usually called will-o'-the-wisp, but science calls them ignis fatuus.

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In modern science, it is generally accepted that most ignis fatuus are caused by the oxidation of phosphine (PH3), diphosphane (P2H4), and methane (CH4). These compounds, produced by organic decay, can cause photon emissions. Since phosphine and diphosphane mixtures spontaneously ignite on contact with the oxygen in air, only small quantities of it would be needed to ignite the much more abundant methane to create ephemeral fires.[30] Furthermore, phosphine produces phosphorus pentoxide as a by-product, which forms phosphoric acid upon contact with water vapor. This might explain the "viscous moisture" described by Blesson.
One attempt to replicate ignis fatuus under laboratory conditions was in 1980 by British geologist Alan A. Mills of Leicester University. Though he did succeed in creating a cool glowing cloud by mixing crude phosphine and natural gas, the color of the light was green and it produced copious amounts of acrid smoke. This was contrary to most eyewitness accounts of ignis fatuus.[31][32] As an alternative, Mills proposed in 2000 that ignis fatuus may instead be cold flames.[31][33] These are luminescent pre-combustion halos that occur when various compounds are heated to just below ignition point. Cold flames are indeed typically bluish in color and as their name suggests, they generate very little heat. Cold flames occur in a wide variety of compounds, including hydrocarbons (including methane), alcohols, aldehydes, oils, acids, and even waxes. However it is unknown if cold flames occur naturally, though a lot of compounds which exhibit cold flames are the natural byproducts of organic decay.[31][34]
A related hypothesis involves the natural chemiluminescence of phosphine. In 2008, the Italian chemists Luigi Garlaschelli and Paolo Boschetti attempted to recreate Mills' experiments. They successfully created a faint cool light by mixing phosphine with air and nitrogen. Though the glow was still greenish in color, Garlaschelli and Boschetti noted that under low-light conditions, the human eye cannot easily distinguish between colors. Furthermore, by adjusting the concentrations of the gases and the environmental conditions (temperature, humidity, etc.), it was possible to eliminate the smoke and smell, or at least render it to undetectable levels. Garlaschelli and Boschetti also agreed with Mills that cold flames may also be a plausible explanation for other instances of ignis fatuus.[33]
In 1993, professors Derr and Persinger proposed that some ignis fatuus may be geologic in origin, piezoelectrically generated under tectonic strain. The strains that move faults would also heat up the rocks, vaporizing the water in them. Rock or soil containing something piezoelectric, like quartz, silicon, or arsenic, may also produce electricity, channeled up to the surface through the soil via a column of vaporized water, there somehow appearing as earth lights. This would explain why the lights appear electrical, erratic, or even intelligent in their behavior.[35][36]
The will-o'-the-wisp phenomena may occur due to the bioluminescence of various forest dwelling micro-organisms and insects. The eerie glow emitted from certain fungal species, such as the honey fungus, during chemical reactions to form white rot could be mistaken for the mysterious will-o'-the-wisp or foxfire lights. There are many other bioluminescent organisms that could create the illusions of fairy lights, such as fireflies. Reflection of light off of larger forest dwelling creatures could explain the phenomena of will-o'-the-whips moving and reacting to other lights. The white plumage of Barn owls may reflect enough light from the moon to appear as a will-o'-the-wisp; hence the possibility of the lights moving, reacting to other lights, etc.[37]
Ignis fatuus sightings are rarely reported today. The decline is believed to be the result of the draining and reclamation of swamplands in recent centuries, such as the formerly vast Fenlands of eastern England which have now been converted to farmlands.


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#6 aisLinnZ

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 09:46 PM

Wow, thank you macCGstudy, for all the info!

It was quite dry at the time of the 'insident'.....though we are N.Ca, it gets pretty drought like and no mini storms form where we are. And thankfully there wasn't an earthquake! I was much younger then-but experienced our 'Loma Prieta' in '89- oof, though I have lived most my life here ... that was the biggest and scariest. So now, I find I am hyper aware....w/the littlest shimmer or shake! Hopefully there were no 'emmissions' in our home! Yikes.

But yes, who knows......but it was all indoors, from kitchen doorway into living room....no oven on. Well, nothing because electricity went out. Not street lights or neighbors; just us, for not more than a minute. And that big ball of green light that stopped right at myself and children's faces. A riddle!
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