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Incorruptible Saints


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#1 LadyAugust

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 09:59 AM

Several years ago, I'd heard about a little girl who died in Europe but whose body wasn't decomposing. The story had photos and everything but I could never find it again. I was starting to think I'd lost my mind, but then I found this story on divine unexplained phenomena and it features a section on"incorruptible" corpses of saints. I fully believe in this, but I'm just curious as to what the skeptical retort is to why these bodies preserve so well?

#2 VlawdeGStudy

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 10:55 AM

Part of it is mummification, versus wholesale decomposition. Some were in airtight containers, and the DID start to decompose when moved. Many have wax or even masks over their face because they are messed up, and some have been treated with substances to help preserve the skin. I guess some folks have a need to try and validate their faith by attributing it to a miracle. Here are a few articles explaining further

http://people.howstu...orruptible1.htm

http://www.orderofth...corrupt-corpses
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#3 Mikaru

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 06:49 PM

View PostVlawdeGStudy, on 27 September 2016 - 10:55 AM, said:

Part of it is mummification, versus wholesale decomposition. Some were in airtight containers, and the DID start to decompose when moved. Many have wax or even masks over their face because they are messed up, and some have been treated with substances to help preserve the skin. I guess some folks have a need to try and validate their faith by attributing it to a miracle. Here are a few articles explaining further

http://people.howstu...orruptible1.htm

http://www.orderofth...corrupt-corpses
Thank you for the validation. I always thought they looked like wax.



#4 buffamy

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 06:41 AM

As Vlawde mentioned, the manner in which a body is stored + any special treatments that've been applied to it will dramatically affect how well it's preserved (or at least how well it cosmetically appears to be).

Also note that if after taking these factors into consideration the remarkable condition of a body seems beyond explanation, for someone to interpret this as a 'good' sign (a religious miracle that validates their faith) is but one interpretation. Historically speaking, in many parts of the world, any bodies appearing unnaturally well-preserved were cause for concern and immediately hacked to pieces and burned to make sure they never disturbed the living. It was seen as a curse, or evidence of demonic power or a vampire, NOT a miracle to put on display or house at a local parish :)

#5 buffamy

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 06:46 AM

in fact, priests themselves would often be overseeing the destruction of these bodies haha

#6 LadyAugust

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 08:03 AM

Yeah, I guess it does boil down to a matter of perspective! Interesting that they coated them in wax. Reminds me a bit of mellification, when people would supposedly consume honey until they died, then be interred in honey for over a century until they themselves became a type of "candy." Obviously a myth but still an interesting concept. I live in LA and there's a place in North Hollywood that supposedly has a clown's corpse in a glass coffin on display. I've seen it but it looks like wax to me.

#7 buffamy

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Posted 02 October 2016 - 07:41 PM

View PostLadyAugust, on 28 September 2016 - 08:03 AM, said:

... Reminds me a bit of mellification, when people would supposedly consume honey until they died, then be interred in honey for over a century until they themselves became a type of "candy." Obviously a myth but still an interesting concept...

Whether it's been done or not, 'candying' a body using honey is actually plausible. Honey has long been used to preserve bodies + in the last thousand years there's been many popular 'corpse cures'.

To me, the highly unlikely part is that whatever substance a vendor was waving in front of someone (and making such claims about) was actually created in this fashion.

Edited by buffamy, 02 October 2016 - 07:51 PM.





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