Free Skins
© Fisana

Jump to content


The Wreck Of The Titan: A Book Written Before The Titanic Tragedy

paranormal precognition premonition

  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 JohnHermes

JohnHermes

    Spirit

  • GS Member
  • 46 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:tarot, dreaming practices, shamanism, magick etc.

Posted 21 February 2019 - 10:22 AM

In 1892 Morgan Robertson wrote a novel called the "The Wreck Of The Titan".  It's an obvious reference to the tragedy of the Titanic which sunk in 1912. The story is about  an "Unsinkable ship" .  This was either pre-planned or this man had some precognitive gifts.  


Quote

The Wreck of the Titan: Or, Futility (originally called Futility) is an 1898 novella written by Morgan Robertson. The story features the fictional ocean liner Titan, which sinks in the North Atlantic after striking an iceberg. Titan and its sinking have been noted to be very similar to the real-life passenger ship RMS Titanic, which sank fourteen years later. Following the sinking of the Titanic, the novel was reissued with some changes, particularly in the ship's gross tonnage.[1]

Although the novel was written before the RMS Titanic was even conceptualized, there are some uncanny similarities between both the fictional and real-life versions. Like the Titanic, the fictional ship sank in April in the North Atlantic, and there were not enough lifeboats for all the passengers. There are also similarities between the size (800 ft (244 m) long for Titan versus 882 ft 9 in (269 m) long for the Titanic[3]), speed (25 knots for Titan, 22.5 knots for Titanic[4]) and life-saving equipment. Similarities between the Titanic and the fictional Titan include:
  • Similar names of the ships[2]
  • Both were described as the largest craft afloat and the greatest of the works of men
    • The Titan was 800 feet long, displacing 45,000 tons (in the 1898 edition).
    • The Titanic was 882 feet long, displacing 46,000 tons.
  • Described as "unsinkable"
  • Had triple screw (propeller)
  • Shortage of lifeboats
    • The Titan carried "as few as the law allowed", 24 lifeboats, which could carry "less than half" of her total complement of 3,000.
    • The Titanic carried only 16 lifeboats (plus 4 Engelhardt folding lifeboats).[5]
  • Struck an iceberg
    • The Titan, moving at 25 knots, struck an iceberg on the starboard side on a night of April, in the North Atlantic, 400 nautical miles (740 km; 460 mi) from Newfoundland (Terranova).
    • The Titanic, moving at 22½ knots,[6] struck an iceberg on the starboard side on the night of April 14, 1912, in the North Atlantic, 400 nautical miles (740 km; 460 mi) from Newfoundland (Terranova).
  • Sinking
    • The Titan sank, and the majority of her 2,500 passengers and crew died; only 13 survived.
    • The Titanic sank, and 1,523 of her 2,200 passengers and crew died; 705 survived.

https://en.wikipedia...n:_Or,_Futility

Edited by JohnHermes, 21 February 2019 - 05:01 PM.


#2 Vlawde

Vlawde

    Exorcism

  • GS Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,152 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fair Oaks Ca
  • Interests:Music, games, movies, the paranormal

Posted 21 February 2019 - 06:15 PM

I've heard about this before. Either an amazing coincidence or something even weirder
Posted Image

#3 True North

True North

    Goblin

  • GS Member
  • PipPip
  • 304 posts

Posted 21 February 2019 - 09:13 PM

800 vs 882
45000 vs 46000
24 vs 16 + 4
25 vs 22.5
400 vs 400
2500 vs 2200
13 vs 705

These sets of numbers are all pretty similar...

except one (which is WAY way off): the number of survivors.

It stands out.

Why bring attention to this?

Because it's possible 13 survivors is code; a 'signature' if you will.

#4 KlaineyGStudy

KlaineyGStudy

    Forum Manager

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,281 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 21 February 2019 - 11:33 PM

Yes, it was amazing and I don't believe in coincidences  :no:
Posted Image


Visit us here: Facebook or Twitter

#5 EVP

EVP

    Wraith

  • GS Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,569 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Connecticut
  • Interests:Digital Stills / Auditory Enigmas

Posted 22 February 2019 - 12:16 AM

As much as I believe we should trust our instincts and take heed with intuition (within common sense of course) I’m left with many doubts when precognitive accuracy is mentioned.  Much of it can be rooted to confirmation bias validating one’s own belief system. Aren’t the laws of probabilities/coincidence a consideration?

Morgan Robertson wrote a short story in 1898 entitled “Futility” but was republished in 1912 as “The Wreck of the Titan”, the very year the “Titanic sunk. Keep in mind the book was tweaked reflecting the catastrophe of the Titanic. Robertson also altered in the republishing of the Titan to reflect the actual dimensions of the Titanic.

Robertson had extensive experience on the sea and served in the capacity for over a decade. Many of the details were commonplace during that time period. One of the biggest fears of North Atlantic trade travel was the drifting of icebergs which had claimed many ships prior.

In 1892, six years prior to Roberson’s novel being published, the White Star line announced construction of a ship with dimensions similar to the story. The names of Titan and Titanic both fit the pattern of names already used by the White Star fleet: Oceanic, Olympic, Majestic and Gigantic.

With the thousands of sea stories, it’s not unrealistic that a handful of stories do in fact unfold by the sheer example of probability.

The story of “Futility/The Wreck of the Titan” is often used by paranormal enthusiast as an example or paranormal existence. I remain unconvinced that a single event represents the whole.

Several years ago, I was researching Dean Radin’s work in the field. He used long and arduous studies with statistics as his mainstay. He came with mixed feelings of his work by his peers as many who inhabit the limelight. I found him interesting but still remain skeptical.

Regardless, we will never convince science of its authenticity. We simply can’t perform repeatable, consistent experimentation with results outside the realm of probability.

To play the devils advocate, I have experienced a couple of “premonitions” with accuracy. In my 20’s, I had friends come over and we were telling strange and unusual stories. One of the gals, began speaking of a dark medium in Meaford, Ontario, Canada, a town 90 minutes north of where we lived. I never had visited the town prior. I stopped her in mid-sentence asking her if I might relay some information about this person. For the next several minutes, I described her appearance in detail, the layout of her house, and the name of the street she lived on. I remember seeing it almost as a waking vision absolutely lucid.

That get together ended within minutes of my dissertation. The gal who began telling the story, left briskly as white as a sheet because of the frighteningly accurate details. I apparently had scared her requiring a fleeing reaction. I was physically spent from the vision and had to rest after.

Again, I’m on the fence when it comes to consistent results, but I recognize occasionally one has to wonder about the laws of probability. It’s looking for that one blade of grass in the lawn of enigmas.

John, thank you for volunteering your time and effort in this thought provoking topic.

Edited by EVP, 22 February 2019 - 12:27 AM.


#6 JohnHermes

JohnHermes

    Spirit

  • GS Member
  • 46 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:tarot, dreaming practices, shamanism, magick etc.

Posted 22 February 2019 - 02:04 AM

Yes but that's a big stretch.  The similarities are too uncanny.  I mean even the name "the wreck of the titan".  I'm not sure about the exact numbers of the probability of it being a coincidence.  But again, I believe its' a huge stretch for it to be mere coincidence, due to the amount of "coincidences" stacked up(If you believe in precognition, if not then theories are very limited).  You're welcome EVP!  We need more discussions like this!   A lot of weird things that have happened in the past and now!

Edited by JohnHermes, 22 February 2019 - 02:10 AM.


#7 EVP

EVP

    Wraith

  • GS Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,569 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Connecticut
  • Interests:Digital Stills / Auditory Enigmas

Posted 22 February 2019 - 03:17 AM

View PostJohnHermes, on 22 February 2019 - 02:04 AM, said:

Yes but that's a big stretch.  The similarities are too uncanny.  I mean even the name "the wreck of the titan".  I'm not sure about the exact numbers of the probability of it being a coincidence.

The Wreck of the Titan was the rename after the Titanic sunk in 1912 John. The original name was Futility published in 1898. Correct me if you find anything to the contrary. I did mention that in my reply. I failed to mention the rename came AFTER the Titanic had sunk.I apologize for the vagueness

Quote

Morgan Robertson wrote a short story in 1898 entitled “Futility” but was republished in 1912 as “The Wreck of the Titan”, the very year the “Titanic sunk.

Edited by EVP, 22 February 2019 - 03:28 AM.


#8 JohnHermes

JohnHermes

    Spirit

  • GS Member
  • 46 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:tarot, dreaming practices, shamanism, magick etc.

Posted 22 February 2019 - 04:23 AM

Ah, I missed that part.  Nice catch.  In the novel itself the ship is called "The Titan" .  Just one letter off from Titanic, prior to 1912.  Up for debate on that, but I still think that's reaching for straws, nonetheless.  Especially now it's mentioned in the novel.

Edited by JohnHermes, 22 February 2019 - 04:24 AM.


#9 True North

True North

    Goblin

  • GS Member
  • PipPip
  • 304 posts

Posted 22 February 2019 - 04:43 PM

White Star was a subsidiary of the International Mercantile Marine Company, owned by J. P. Morgan (& Co.), and so, the Titanic was owned by Morgan. Morgan had been booked for the maiden voyage but canceled days before the Titanic set sail.
Sure, people change plans, things come up, happens all the time, but, considering some of the circles Morgan and other prominent bankers belong to, and knowing these scoundrels' penchant for engineering disasters, I'd say Morgan knew his ship was on a one-way trip to the ocean floor.

#10 KlaineyGStudy

KlaineyGStudy

    Forum Manager

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,281 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 23 February 2019 - 04:27 AM

This is an interesting topic I wish there was an 1898 copy online of the original novella "Futility". From what I could find out the 1912 reissued publications might have been the work of enthusiastic editors to make the prophecy better after the sinking of the Titanic. These are the statistic changes:   
  • Titan 1898 Edition 145 pages Titan 1912 Reprint 251 pages.
  • the gross tonnage,Titan 1898 Edition 45,000 Titan 1912 Reprint 70,000 Titanic 46,328
  • the amount of water displacement,Titan 1898 Edition   45,000 Titan 1912 Reprint 75,000   Titanic 66,000
  • horsepower, Titan 1898 Edition   40.000 Titan 1912 Reprint 70,000 Titanic 45,000
  • Length Titan 1898 Edition 800 Titan 1912 Reprint  800 Titanic  882.5
  • Watertight compartments Titan 1898 Edition 15 Titan 1912 Reprint 15 Titanic 9
  • Titan 1912 Reprint the inclusion of the word 'unsinkable',
  • and the changing of the title from "Futility" to " The Wreck of the Titan or, Futility."
It is said it was also given a happier ending keeping it more to a Hollywood ending.

Similarities:

  First of all the two ships had almost the same name Titan and Titanic

- The Titanic was 882.5 feet in length, the Titan 800 feet

- Both were made of steel with 3 propellers and 2 masts

- Both were considered unsinkable because of the number of watertight compartments; 15 on the Titan 9 on the Titanic

- The Titan had 92 watertight doors, the Titanic 12

- Both were considered ‘the biggest passenger ship ever built’

- Both were equipped to carry 3,000 passengers

- The Titan carried 3,000 the Titanic 2,235

- The Titanic displaced 66,000 tons, the Titan 45,000

- The horsepower of the Titanic was 45,000 that of the Titan 40,000

- Both carried very few lifeboats- 20 the Titanic 24 the Titan

- The Titan was travelling at 22.5 knots when it hit the iceberg the Titan 25 knots

- Both the ships began their voyages in April

- Both ships hit the iceberg at midnight

- It was a clear night without a moon for the Titanic, but for the Titan, it was a night of thick fog with moonlight

- Both ships were hit on the starboard side

- Both were travelling between New York and England

- The Titanic was making her maiden voyage from England to New York. The Titan was going in the opposite direction and it was her third round-trip.

- Both ships were owned by companies in Britain with offices in Liverpool

Robertson didn't like his clairvoyant status and claimed the similarities between his short story and the Titanic were explained by his extensive knowledge of shipbuilding and maritime trends.
Posted Image


Visit us here: Facebook or Twitter

#11 JohnHermes

JohnHermes

    Spirit

  • GS Member
  • 46 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:tarot, dreaming practices, shamanism, magick etc.

Posted 23 February 2019 - 04:34 AM

There are theories that people on that ship were going to shut down the Federal Reserve.   Powerful people who opposed J.P. Morgan, Rothschild etc.  The Titanic's purpose was to get rid of them.  Spooky theory.

Edited by JohnHermes, 23 February 2019 - 04:35 AM.


#12 JohnHermes

JohnHermes

    Spirit

  • GS Member
  • 46 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:tarot, dreaming practices, shamanism, magick etc.

Posted 23 February 2019 - 07:38 AM

1898 editions right here, if anyone wants to check it out.  https://electrodes.f...n_1898_1912.pdf

#13 KlaineyGStudy

KlaineyGStudy

    Forum Manager

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,281 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 23 February 2019 - 07:12 PM

View PostJohnHermes, on 23 February 2019 - 07:38 AM, said:

1898 editions right here, if anyone wants to check it out.  https://electrodes.f...n_1898_1912.pdf

I think you will find that this too is a reissued publication of the original 1898 story and the 1912 enhanced storyline.  I believe the novella was titled "Futility" and not sure how many copies were printed.

Futility
By Morgan Robertson
Author of Spun-yarn
New York: M.F. Mansfield 22 East Sixteenth Street 1898 - Shipwrecks - 145 pages
Posted Image


Visit us here: Facebook or Twitter

#14 KlaineyGStudy

KlaineyGStudy

    Forum Manager

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,281 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 23 February 2019 - 07:25 PM

LOL I found it hit the Digital Copy to read the 1989 original
Posted Image


Visit us here: Facebook or Twitter

#15 JohnHermes

JohnHermes

    Spirit

  • GS Member
  • 46 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:tarot, dreaming practices, shamanism, magick etc.

Posted 24 February 2019 - 02:57 AM

lolol, Sent to the future to write about the past

#16 earthlydelitesGStudy

earthlydelitesGStudy

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,053 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Sydney

Posted 26 February 2019 - 11:50 PM

I've always loved the connection between that book and the Titanic, very chilling indeed. Thanks for bringing it up on the boards!
It's in the trees, it's coming!





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: paranormal, precognition, premonition